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prettyneatsolutions@gmail.com  |  315-400-1966  |  All content Copyright © 2018 Pretty Neat  |  Legal  |  Site design by Carrie Luteran

How to Arrange Furniture in Two Easy Steps

 

I receive a lot of questions about furniture arrangement, and the truth is most rooms can only accommodate a couple of functional layouts. Here are the two steps I always take to create floor plans that flow:
 
1. Determine the path of circulation - Every room has at least one doorway to enter and exit, and most have multiple openings that lead to other spaces. Start by picturing the paths of circulation as the most direct line from doorway to doorway. If you have trouble doing this in your head, use some blue painter’s tape to mark it on the floor. This main circulation path should be at least three feet wide to make for comfortable maneuvering, so account for that space as well. Open areas around this path will emerge as the obvious location for your furniture.
 
2. Identify pieces that need to sit against a wall - Certain furniture needs to be placed against a wall, such as the TV console in a living room or dressers in the bedroom. Figure out where those pieces can go (without obscuring any windows, of course), and that will usually leave very few options to place the rest of your furniture.
 
Here is an example using a space I consulted on recently:

This is a large great room that was intended for TV viewing as well as dining. It has an open entryway from the hall at one end and sliding glass doors leading to an outdoor deck at the other. The doorways are at opposite corners of the room, so a direct circulation path divides the space diagonally.

The only clear wall space large enough to accommodate the TV is indicated with a blue dot. Once that was in place, the rest of the living room furniture was arranged within comfortable viewing distance. That left the blank area in the opposite corner for the dining table. The circulation path has to warp a bit to get around the furniture, but it still allows for easy access to the doorways and seating areas.
 
Still need help with your own space planning?
Contact me to set up a consultation!
 
Make it fab!
Carrie

 

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